Bing Blocked 130 Million Ads in 2016

Bing Blocked 130 Million Ads in 2016

With malicious scammers all across the internet, paid SEM platforms such as Bing Ads and Google AdWords need to constantly block ads created by these internet con artists. On February 7th, Bing released their annual Ad Quality in Review report, highlighting their efforts against “bad ads”.

According to the report, there were a total of 130 million ads blocked last year by Bing. While this is a far cry from Google’s 1.7 billion ads blocked, this number still illustrates the number of scams that infect the internet each year. The reasons why the ads were blocked are broken down below:

  • Phishing: Scams that attempt to convince users to provide them with their password or sensitive information. According to Bing, 7,000 sites were blocked for phishing scams
  • Counterfeit: The sale of fake goods. Of the 130 million ads blocked, 1 million of them were counterfeit ads.
  • Tech Support Scams: When you’re contacted by somebody posing as a reputable company’s tech support, telling you that your computer has a virus. They usually look for monetary compensation in return. This constituted 17 million of the blocked ads.
  • Download: Ads that violated Bing’s download guidelines. There were 4 million download ads blocked.
  • Scareware: Ads which highjack the user’s computer or blocks them from accessing their files (Crypolocked).
  • Misleading Ads: Ads which purposefully misled users. There were 7 million of these ads blocked.

Bing also blocked 175,000 advertisers for violating their guidelines. Bing’s automated system for blocking these ads can take the credit for most of these blocked ads. As Bing put it, it would take 500 years to remove this number of ads if they had just one person working to remove these ads.

For honest advertisers, it’s still important to make sure all of your ads follow their guidelines as ads coming from reputable companies still get blocked all the time for a variety of reasons. Make sure you’re constantly checking the email account tied to your AdWords or Bing Ads account, since you don’t want your whole campaign to get shut down.

Michael Hilperts
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